TONY JANIRO, YOUNGSTOWN’S FAMOUS BOXER

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Tony Janiro

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tony Janiro (born Anthony Gianiro; February 2, 1926 – February 21, 1985) was an Italian-American middleweight boxer from Youngstown, Ohio. Janiro never won a championship, although he faced many of the top fighters of his era. Despite his reputation as a playboy who avoided training,  [1]Tony Janiro was one of the greatest fighters that ever came out of Youngstown. Throughout his nine year professional career which ran from 1943 to 1952,  During the 1940’s he was consistently ranked among the top 10 middleweights in the world and compiled an outstanding record of 80-15- 2 (26 K O’s)

Early life and boxing career

Janiro was born in Springdale, Pennsylvania, but his family relocated to Youngstown when he was four years old.[1] He left Youngstown for New York at the age of 16 to pursue a career in boxing.[2] Janiro received advice and assistance from fellow Youngstown native Lenny “Boom Boom” Mancini (father of Ray Mancini), who introduced Janiro to his manager, Frankie Jacobs, and boxing trainer Ray Arcel.[2] In the 1940s, Janiro was ranked among the top 10 middleweights and fought Hall of Famers such as .   Rocky Graziano,. Kid Gavilan,Jake LaMotta,Beau Jack and top contender Rocky Castellani .                 [1] During one bout at Madison Square Garden, the young boxer was introduced to ringside fan Harry S. Truman, then President of the United States.[2] Janiro had one draw with Graziano, who knocked him out in 1951.[3] He fought from 1943 to 1952.In a battle of Italian contenders Janiro met Castellani on July 13,1949 outdoors at Scranton ,Pa stadium and lost a hard-fought 10 round decision.

The boxing world took notice when Janiro fought Rocky Graziano on March 31,1950 and would end up in split decision with Janiro holding his own with the renounced Graziano. He fought 18 times in Madison Square Garden.   The last win of his career came on June 7, 1951 as he took a 10 round decision over Charley fusari in Newark ,NJ.   Through the first 94 fights of Janiro‘s career he was never knocked out. Janiro traveled to Paris, France on June 30,1952 and was knocked out in the fifth round . It was the final bout of Janiro’s professional nine-year career.

Retirement and final years

After his retirement, he worked as a bartender, at the Neutral Corner, a bar located near Stillman’s Gym that was frequented by boxing managers and trainers.[1] (The bar is often referred to in journalist A.J. Liebling‘s boxing articles.) Several years before his death, Janiro returned to Youngstown, where he was employed at the Mahoning County Courthouse.[1] In 1984, he was inducted into the Youngstown Curbstone Coaches Hall of Fame, and was honored at a testimonial banquet held in Boardman, Ohio.[1] Speakers at the event included former boxing champions Willie Pep, Jake LaMotta, Beau Jack, and Carmen Basilio.[2]

Tony Janiro died of kidney failure after suffering a heart attack in his home in the spring of 1985.[1] He was survived by his sister, Mrs. Amelia Marian; a brother, Frank of Youngstown, and a granddaughter.[1] Funeral services for Janiro were held at St. Christine’s Roman Catholic Church, in Youngstown.[1]

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